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Knife Attacks

Posted by firedefense on April 30, 2014 at 10:30 AM Comments comments (0)
Knife attacks

 
As long as people have used knives as tools, they have also used them as weapons.  Knife attacks are not a new thing, but it seems recently, knives have been used in several high profile cases.  In one particular case, at least 20 people were injured in the attack.
 
What would you do if faced with an assailant with armed with a knife?  The obvious answer would be to pull your firearm, and attempt to defend yourself.  You'll notice I said "ATTEMPT" to defend yourself.  Could you pull your weapon before the attacker buried his blade six inches deep in your chest?  If you said yes, then chances are you've had some training.  If you aren't sure, or "think so", then you probably have never thought about it, or have never received any training in defending against an edged weapon. 
 
Many of you have heard of the Tueller Drill.  Some haven't, so I'll give a brief description of it.  Sergeant Dennis Tueller, of the Salt Lake City, Utah Police Department wanted to find out how quickly an average officer could draw their weapon from the holster, and stop an attacker charging them from a distance of 21ft.  It took most officers approximately 1.5 seconds to draw their weapon.  
 
I have done this drill many times, and I'm here to tell you, that it is challenging.  It sounds easy, but once you are the one standing there, and someone armed with a training knife is about you jam it in your gut, things change in a hurry.  With that said, there is a simple way to win.
 
Movement.  If you wish to try the Tueller Drill, first, get a training firearm, or Airsoft pistol.  Have your training partner stand 21 feet away.  Once your partner starts their motion towards you, draw your weapon and move off the "X", or other words, the place you were standing.  I don't really care where you move too, just move.
 
Like every new drill, the first couple of times you do it, you'll fumble your way through.  But with enough reps, you'll get better, and hopefully be better prepared, for the day when you're faced with an edged weapon. 
 
Until next time, train hard, and stay safe!
 
Team F.I.R.E.  

Are you too old?

Posted by firedefense on December 11, 2013 at 8:30 AM Comments comments (0)

Are you too old?


I'm sorry dear reader that I've been away for a few months. Life has been hectic, and you all weren't here a couple of months, so this article might be a bit dated.


Like some of you, I did the Tough Mudder event this year at Heartland Park. My brother and I run a lot of 5k obstacle runs, and even some longer courses, but this one was clearly head and shoulders above the rest in terms of difficulty. While I finished in a respectable (for me) three hours, I admit the last two miles were very hard. I'm still nursing a knee injury from the event. I can still run, but not more than a mile and half without some pain. I'll survive, but I can assure you that I will not be partcipatng next year. I've done it, got the Tshirt, and have the head band to prove it.


With that said, how many of you did it too? I personally know of a few of you who did, but what about the rest of you? Too busy, too hard, too out of shape, or are you too old for this sort of thing? I heard every excuse while training for Mudder, especially the "I'm too old for that sort of thing". My own grandma, bless her heart, told me I was too old, and perhaps a less stressful past time was best for me. Clearly, I told her she was crazy, but in a nice, loving grandson kind of way.

While on the course, I had a chance to meet two very inspiraional people. Both were older guys, and by older I mean 60 or older. The first guy I met was keeping up with my brother and I, both young pups to him. He was laughing at the people he was leaving behind. As we were struggling to get through an obstacle, I asked him what the secret was, and he told me something I already knew. Keep training, never give up, and have fun. I told this guy that it was great to see him out there, and I loved his attiude. He said thanks, and then proceeded to out run me!


The second "older" guy I met, was running with his son. He told me that they liked to spend their weekends running the Tough Mudder all over the country. He said that they had run the event on Saturday too (we were running on Sunday). I told this guy that I was inspired by his toughness, and he told me to never quit having fun. Then both of us proceeded to get the crap shocked out of us in the Dark Lighting obstacle!

I hope these stories inspire you to go out, have some fun, and ever get old. Okay, we're still going to get old, but never lose your sense of adventure, and willingness to try. We all have seen older folks who have just quit on life. Don't be them. Life every day like it's your last, and always be willing to try something new.

Until next time, train hard, and stay safe!

Team FIRE

Women On Target 2013

Posted by firedefense on September 16, 2013 at 5:40 PM Comments comments (0)

Howdy all,

I just wanted to tell everyone that the 2013 edition of Women On Target was a huge success.  The event was held at the Shawnee Co. Hunter's Safety Education range.  It is a great faciltiy, and have good people working it. 

I wanted to pass on an awesome discription of the event by Charlie Herman, one of this year's attendees.  Here's what she had to say:

"Fun day training with over 60 ladies. We were divided into groups of ten. I was with the 3 other ladies I went there with, a couple I met when I first got there, and a few others that were really nice. Session 1: Self Defense--learned how to fight off an attacker, so don't mess with me...or else!!! Session 2: Archery--loved this!!! I'm left eye dominant, so I practiced both a left handed bow and a right handed bow. I was better right handed. Session 3: Shotgun--I've never shot skeet before and I hit a couple and shattered a couple--very exciting!!! Session 4: Air pistols--we shot at Solo cups. It was more fun then I would have thought, but it feels different than a real gun. Session 5: Rifles--.22's, AR15s, and a 308. Session 6: handguns--a small revolver, 22, 9 mm Glock, 38 Special, and a 44 Magnum (Dirty Harry gun). It was a fun day!!"

We plan on holding another WOT in 2014.  Hope to see you there!

Until next time, take care, and stay safe!

Team F.I.R.E.

Gear Setup

Posted by firedefense on April 3, 2013 at 7:15 PM Comments comments (0)

Gear setup

This month's article is going to address something that bothers me every time we go to the range. Okay, let me modify that, this subject drives me nuts almost daily. Gear set up. Specifically I'm talking about any protective equipment worn (IBA, plate carrier, etc.) that holds your extra mags, IFAK, flashlight, Skittles, and any other tacti-cool thing you want or need.

In my travels through the military, and civilian law enforcement worlds, I've seen people set up their gear into three categories.

1. The minimalist. This person has seen body armor, and heck, they might have tried it on once. This person might loosely hang a (yes singular) pouch anywhere it will fit, and probably will still use their pocket as a place to store extra mags. And trust me, that pocket will be on the same side as the hand they are using to shoot with. To watch this person conduct a reload, is both comical, and scary.

2. The gear junkie. This guy/gal has every piece of tactical Velcro ever made, and is making a 40lb IBA even heavier. While I do like gear, and have a lot of tacti-cool stuff, too much stuff will make you less effective if you need to shoot, move, and communicate. This guy/gal has so much stuff, they'll put pouches and equipment anywhere there is open space. If you might be this person, please avoid putting any piece of gear in the small of your back. If you should fall, and you have something hard there (handcuffs), you run the risk of stunning the nerve center located in the small of your back. While this won't permanently take you out of the fight, it could temporarily keep you from moving to cover, or worse.

3. The educated, or experienced guy/gal. This person has either been around a while, and figured out what works, or has benefited from someone showing them how to set their gear up properly. This person knows their gear must be comfortable to wear for extended periods. They also know what the most important items on their gear are: 1. Ammo 2. Communication 3. First Aid

To properly set up your gear, please keep those things in mind. Let's explore it a bit further:

1. Place your ammo pouches in front, and be able to access them with your NON shooting hand. This goes for both pistol and rifle mags. Typically, your mag pouches will be at the lowest point on your IBA without hanging off the vest.

2. Place your radio pouch in an area that you can access it with your NON shooting hand.

3. Your first aid kit should be in a place that you can access it, even if it means a little work to get to it. I like to place mine between the side, and backside of my IBA. It's kind of an awkward place, but it won't be in the way if I need to go prone, or supine.

4. Miscellaneous gear pouch. I will put another small pouch directly opposite of my IFAK. This can be used for handcuffs, gloves, Skittles, etc.

5. Keep your firing shoulder open. If you must put pouches above your mag pouches, keep it to small stuff like your flashlight, handcuffs, etc.

I sincerely hope some of this advice is helpful. If you want, or need some advice on gear setup, please feel free to shoot us an email!

Until next time, train hard, and stay safe!

Team F.I.R.E.

Gear Setup

Posted by firedefense on April 3, 2013 at 7:15 PM Comments comments (0)

Gear setup

This month's article is going to address something that bothers me every time we go to the range. Okay, let me modify that, this subject drives me nuts almost daily. Gear set up. Specifically I'm talking about any protective equipment worn (IBA, plate carrier, etc.) that holds your extra mags, IFAK, flashlight, Skittles, and any other tacti-cool thing you want or need.

In my travels through the military, and civilian law enforcement worlds, I've seen people set up their gear into three categories.

1. The minimalist. This person has seen body armor, and heck, they might have tried it on once. This person might loosely hang a (yes singular) pouch anywhere it will fit, and probably will still use their pocket as a place to store extra mags. And trust me, that pocket will be on the same side as the hand they are using to shoot with. To watch this person conduct a reload, is both comical, and scary.

2. The gear junkie. This guy/gal has every piece of tactical Velcro ever made, and is making a 40lb IBA even heavier. While I do like gear, and have a lot of tacti-cool stuff, too much stuff will make you less effective if you need to shoot, move, and communicate. This guy/gal has so much stuff, they'll put pouches and equipment anywhere there is open space. If you might be this person, please avoid putting any piece of gear in the small of your back. If you should fall, and you have something hard there (handcuffs), you run the risk of stunning the nerve center located in the small of your back. While this won't permanently take you out of the fight, it could temporarily keep you from moving to cover, or worse.

3. The educated, or experienced guy/gal. This person has either been around a while, and figured out what works, or has benefited from someone showing them how to set their gear up properly. This person knows their gear must be comfortable to wear for extended periods. They also know what the most important items on their gear are: 1. Ammo 2. Communication 3. First Aid

To properly set up your gear, please keep those things in mind. Let's explore it a bit further:

1. Place your ammo pouches in front, and be able to access them with your NON shooting hand. This goes for both pistol and rifle mags. Typically, your mag pouches will be at the lowest point on your IBA without hanging off the vest.

2. Place your radio pouch in an area that you can access it with your NON shooting hand.

3. Your first aid kit should be in a place that you can access it, even if it means a little work to get to it. I like to place mine between the side, and backside of my IBA. It's kind of an awkward place, but it won't be in the way if I need to go prone, or supine.

4. Miscellaneous gear pouch. I will put another small pouch directly opposite of my IFAK. This can be used for handcuffs, gloves, Skittles, etc.

5. Keep your firing shoulder open. If you must put pouches above your mag pouches, keep it to small stuff like your flashlight, handcuffs, etc.

I sincerely hope some of this advice is helpful. If you want, or need some advice on gear setup, please feel free to shoot us an email!

Until next time, train hard, and stay safe!

Team F.I.R.E.

New Year Resolutions - 2013 Style

Posted by firedefense on January 1, 2013 at 9:00 AM Comments comments (0)

New Year's Resolutions

Since you are reading this, it would appear we survived the end of the world. I'm fairly disappointed, as I really wanted to fight zombies, and other critters!

Another year has passed, and I know for myself, it's been a very busy year. My kid has been growing leaps and bounds, and we've been busier than ever. I'm sure the last year for everyone reading this, was probably every bit as busy as my past year. I also hope your New Year's festivities were fun, but very uneventful.

This time of year always brings around the age old question: "What will be your New Year's Resolution?" Most people out there will talk about it, and some might even make a commitment to lose some weight, or to stop a bad habit. Do you have something in mind that you would like to change? I know I do.

My New Year's Resolution is to fight complacency. If you have done any job for any amount of time, you know that complacency can, and will creep in to your work place. How do we fight complacency? Here are some ideas:

1. Communicate with your supervisor. I know not everyone loves their boss. But, we have to work with them, and for them, so we might as well get along. Communicating what is expected of you, and how you can improve your quality of work, might be a great way to fight complacency.

2. Attend training. Any training related to your job is a great way to refresh why you took that job, or why you were attracted to that career field. I like to attend anything that improves my effectiveness as a law enforcement officer.

3. Accept that bad things happen. We live in an ugly world, and it's hard to accept that bad things happen to good people. For myself, I am trying to savor every moment I have with my family, and I hope you do too. We don't know when it will end for us, so go and live your life, and be as safe as you can.

4. Prepare for the worst, and hope for the best. This is similar to #3, but I'm more specifically talking about your physical skills. Continue, or start a new workout routine. Get out and shoot as much as you can. To help fight complacency, conduct your training with your job in mind. Whenever I shoot, or workout, I start by thinking about WHY, I'm doing whatever I'm doing.

I hope some of these simple ideas help you with your New Year's Resolution. If you're not into resolutions, I understand, but I hope it helps anyway.

Until next time, train hard, and stay safe!

Team F.I.R.E.

My last article ever!!

Posted by firedefense on December 2, 2012 at 12:45 PM Comments comments (0)

My last article ever!!


Okay, if the world doesn't end on Dec. 21st, you will unfortunately read my

dull words again very soon. I know not all the articles are bad, they just

seem like it to me!


Well, how many of you are ready for zombies to strike in force on the evening of the 21st?

I know just about everyone is saying they are ready, but are you? Do you have your Bug Out

Bag ready? Do you have enough food and water for you and your family? What about your kids

if you have any? Are you prepared to keep them alive as well? Do you have enough ammo to

last a couple of weeks? Have you networked ahead of time with others, to seek shelter in

case you can't stay at your residence? There are so many questions, and so little time to

get ready!


Since many of you will depend on family and friends for protection, are they ready to Shoot,

Move, and Communicate? If you don't know, I bet it's safe to assume they are NOT ready to

do this. Here's a simple drill that you can do with your friends or family to help them

prepare to keep the zombies at bay while you move from one safe place to another.


Moving/Move drill ‐ Start by working with two people. Set up two targets, move back to the

15yrd line, and to either the far left, or right side of the firing line. Shooter #1 will

initiate the drill by shooting at both the first and second targets. Shooter #2 will then

yell "Moving", to which Shooter #1 will yell back "MOVE". Shooter #2 will move around the

back of Shooter #1 approx. 5‐7yrds. Shooter #2 will set up online with Shooter #1, and

start shooting both targets. At this time Shooter #1 will yell "MOVING", to which Shooter

#2 will respond with, "MOVE". Shooter #1 will move around Shooter #2, and set up online and

start shooting. Both shooters will keep doing this until they reach their destination.

What you are doing is simply leap frogging your partner.


When first attempting this drill, just walk it using unloaded firearms. As you get better,

incorporate live fire. You should do this with handguns, rifles, and shotguns. When you

really feel like accomplishing something, start with a long gun, and transition to a handgun.

Never stop moving, just transition and keep moving.


My wife and I like to do this drill a lot, as it gets the blood pumping a bit, and also

builds the bonds of marriage. Heck, I don't even mind having to replace the light bulbs in

my tail lights that have the filament blown out of them, which tends to happen when we shoot

around the vehicles.  I hope this simple drill adds a bit of fun to your holiday shooting regimen.


Until next time (or not), train hard, and stay safe!

Team F.I.R.E. 


The worst possible time.

Posted by firedefense on October 9, 2012 at 12:50 AM Comments comments (0)

The worst possible time.

In this rant, I want to take a stroll off into left field a bit. I want to talk about "SHTF" (Stuff Hitting The Fan) at the worst possible moment.

Each of us probably has thought about reacting to some unforeseen event, (or threat) that requires us to spring into action in a moment's notice. When we do think of this "SHTF" moment, we all see in our minds eye, that we come out the victor. This is because we were fully rested, had the best gear, used OUTSTANDING tactics, and have the blood of Rambo running through our veins. But is this reality? Most likely, the "SHTF" moment will happen when we are least prepared for it. I envision the zombie hordes attacking while I'm at the zoo with my family, or most likely when I forgot to grab a gallon of milk, and had to make a Wal-Mart run at 2am. It will never happen when I'm sitting at my house, AR-15 in hand, with all the mags loaded, and ready.

I know we are talking about a fictional (or is it...) event, we all know that stuff happens when we least expect it. Are you ready to fight the guy that is getting pissed because the cashier is taking too long? Are you prepared to render first aid to the person enjoying a day at the park? How about being prepared to hunker down in your vehicle if you are caught in a snow storm? I know some of you can answer yes to all of these, but what about the other 90%? If you aren't ready, why not?

Here are some things that I personally have done to help myself prepare for that unexpected "SHTF" moment:

1. I put gun in my vehicle, and my wife's. I have a gun safe in each vehicle that can be bolted down, or cable locked around the seat. I also keep extra ammo in each safe, and a little cash too. These guns NEVER leave the vehicle, except to get shot and cleaned. They are returned ASAP, because I don't want to be caught trying to get home with no protection.

2. Emergency break down kit. This kit has all the standard stranded car stuff. I have added another blanket, water, and a little food to the kit to make sure I have provisions to last me a few days if need be.

3. First aid training. I try to get as much training as possible. I'm always on the prowl for more, and this defiantly includes first aid training. A good resource that I like to utilize, is the American Red Cross. Check out their website for all kinds of first aid training. The best thing is, most of it is cheap, and readily available. Also make sure you keep several first aid kits around. At least one for the vehicle, and a couple for the home.

4. Training, training, training. Please seek out all kinds of training. It's good to be well rounded, and it's easy to do in this day and age. If you can afford to attend live training, that is the best way to go, but if you can't, get some DVD's, or even check out YouTube, it's a great resource for just about anything you want.

I hope some of my ranting sinks in for some of you, but I know lots of folks will just dismiss my article with the attitude of "nothing like that will happen to me". To all of you who are preparing for that "SHTF" moment, I'm happy to hear it. As for the rest of you, please keep on believing it won't happen to you.

Take care, and stay safe!

Team F.I.R.E.

Shooting vs. Training

Posted by firedefense on July 21, 2012 at 1:30 AM Comments comments (0)

Shooting vs Training


As someone in the firearms business for the military, and in the civilian

world, I often have a chance to teach a good number of students. I always

hear about how many times they go shooting, but rarely do I hear someone say

they went "training". Now I know, some people use the term "shooting"

as their default word for training. But do they use their time on the range

as an opportunity to get better, or is it a relaxing fun time with buddies?

I bet most people's range time meets the "fun" definition, more than the

actual "training" definition.


Now don't get me wrong, I think shooting is VERY fun, but I conduct actual

training every time I go to the range. In fact, I can't remember the last

time I went "plinking". Over the years, I have found that ammo is too

expensive, and my time too valuable just to shoot some pop cans, or whatever

else I have laying around.


So, how do we go from "plinking", to training?


1. Formulate a plan of what you want to accomplish. Include the weapons

system (rifle or handgun) round count, and what you want to work on.

Example of things to work on would include: reloads, multiple targets,

malfunction clearance, etc.

2. At the range, record the time, date, type of ammo, and what you did. If

you want to time yourself, download a free range timer app for your smart

phone.

3. Keep a log of what you do, so you can work on different things, and find

areas that need improvement.


Now that you have a few tips on record keeping, let me give you a drill that

you can do with both the handgun, and the carbine.


This is called the 2x2x2 Reload drill. To set this up, use three separate

target backers, and space them about 3 feet apart. Paste one paper plate or

other target on each of the backers. You will need three mags, and six rds

for this drill. Load two rounds in each mag, and place one mag in the

weapon, and two in a holder. Stand at the 5yd line, and shoot two rds on

the first target, reload, shoot two rds on the second, reload, and shoot the

last two rds on the third. As you get better at this, put pressure on

yourself by using a shot timer, and moving the yardage back as far as you

want.


I hope these ideas help you move from the "plinking" mindset to the

"training" mindset. Be creative, have fun, and always strive to improve.


Until next time, train hard and stay safe!

Team F.I.R.E.

Bug Out Bags

Posted by firedefense on May 4, 2012 at 1:45 AM Comments comments (0)

Bug Out Bags

Already this spring, we have seen disastrous storms rip though our part of the state.  With this in mind, I want to take this month’s article in a somewhat different direction.  While I do stray off the firearms topic from time to time, most of you understand that I always try to write about something related to safety and security. 


Let’s start out with what a Bug Out Bag is.  A BOB can be anything that is easy to haul, and will supply you and your family for up to three days.  A BOB can be set up for longer or shorter periods, depending on how elaborate you wish to get.  I personally have a three day BOB set up, as I have long term supplies elsewhere. 


The next logical question is, what kind of carrier should I use?  For me, I use an old medium size Alice pack.  With that said, you can use just about any kind of bag you want.  I have seen people use a plain old backpack, and it worked just fine for them.  The most important thing to remember is, pick something you don’t mind having just sit around, as that’s probably what it’s going to do until the day you need it.  Again, I preferred to use something that didn’t cost a lot, and isn’t needed in my day to day life.  


Next, let’s talk about what goes into the BOB:

1.      One extra set of clothes for the wife, kid, and myself.

2.      One 4ft x 9ft tarp.  This can be used as a shelter, ground tarp, blanket, anything else you              can imagine.

3.      One roll of heavy duty 55 gallon trash bags.  These can be used as shelters, sleeping bags,          water storage, anything else you can imagine.

4.      50ft of 550 cord.

5.      Photo copy of DL, social security card, birth certificate in a plastic bag.

6.      1 small fleece blanket

7.      2 pack of Bic lighters

8.      Flint and steal

9.      Hunting type knife

10.     First aid kit containing band aids, aspirin, antacid, and also a tourniquet.  

11.     1 box of chewy granola bars

12.     3 bags of freeze dried meals from Wal-Mart.

13.     120rds of .223

14.     100rds of 9mm

15.     Canteen and canteen cup to cook with.

16.     Water purification bottle and tabs.

17.     General purpose survival guide.


This seems like a lot of stuff, but trust me, when you really think about it, I really have the bare minimum to survive.  Again, this bag is meant to get me to more supplies, and is not meant to live out of long term.


I hope you never have to use your BOB, but if the day comes when you do, you’ll be happy that you took the time and effort to put one together.


Until next time, train hard and stay safe!

Team F.I.R.E.